Charlton residents' anger as council fails to treat snow (again)

Yet another failure of the Council to deal properly with the January snowfall caused anger and concern among Charlton residents.  In 2009, the Council bizarrely resorted to gritting the streets of Greenwich with broken glass.  In January 2010, they had not improved on the previous year's debacle, failing to treat the hillier pedestrian areas of Charlton. 

Charlton Conservative James Garry spoke to concerned residents around Eastcombe Avenue, Victoria Way and Wyndcliff Road during the snowy spell in January.  There was a uniform opinion that the Council had not taken adequate measures to ensure that these hilly streets were safe and that it had done a disservice to all residents, but especially the young and the elderly.

Simultaneously, public dissatisfaction with the Labour council's propaganda rag Greenwich Time had reached crisis point.  More than once, residents framed questions such as "If the council scrapped Greenwich Time, how many extra gritters and bags of grit would there be?"

James decided to put this to Greenwich council.  He emailed the following questions to them:


1. Would the Council consider scrapping "Greenwich Time" in order to pay for more useful resources. Salt, for example?

2. During this year's heavy snowfall, the Council failed to grit the pavements of the hilly areas of Eastcombe Avenue, Wyndcliff Road etc. Victoria Way was gritted belatedly after the worst of the snow had passed. Gritting was performed basically by a man "sowing" palmfuls of salt from a bag.  Last year's heavy snowfall was treated with broken glass.  Does the Council acknowledge that it has neither the strategy, technology, nor the ability to learn from past mistakes so as to protect its residents, especially its young, its elderly and infirm, against snowy and icy conditions?

James received acknowledgement of his email saying that his email was forwarded to the relevant Cabinet Member and Chief Officer who would respond directly to his questions.

In the middle of February, James is still awaiting answers to his questions.

James said: "This is typical of Greenwich council. Slow and inefficient at dealing with problems.  To compound matters, they do not bother to reply to residents' communications.  They think they are above accountability.  They have been in power for so long that they think they can take residents for granted.  The only way this can ever change is for residents to vote Conservative at the next local election."

James will repeat his questions at the next full council meeting from the public circle where the council will not have recourse to bury their head in the sand. Or in the snow.

Ward: